We have a window in our bathroom! (A skylight, technically, since the exterior bathroom wall slopes outward and is shingled.) Except I have yet to see the window, because it's on the front of the house and I came in through the back door when coming home tonight, and there's still a bathroom wall between the room and the window/exterior wall. Getting the actual window in was the only time-/weather-sensitive part, and [dreamwidth.org profile] scruloose and the contractor agreed that the drywall would stay intact for now. (I wasn't here for the discussion, so I don't actually know if that's because [dreamwidth.org profile] scruloose and I haven't finalized what we're doing with that part of the room (the extra floor space we could gain by removing the existing interior wall and just having the sloped wall), or because of time constraints, or because that's just not being part of what that contracting company does...? *shrugs* But we have a window.

K.B. Spangler has a new book out this week--one that's not connected to A Girl and Her Fed. (Digital only right now, but a print version is coming.) [twitter.com profile] seananmcguire wrote a short Twitter thread in response when Spangler announced the new book's availability; the key takeaway about the actual writing is "If you want some of the most elegantly written, internally consistent, funny, touching, TRUE science fiction coming out today, you should take a look at @KBSpangler. She's the real deal, y'all. She's writing shit that breaks every rule, and still works."

In related news, I just spent a vile amount on US-to-Canada shipping* to get a print copy of Rise Up Swearing (so far the only compiled volume of AGAHF) and a little pin of Bubbles, the Fed's digital clownfish...avatar? (I'm blanking on the correct word. "Avatar" is applied to something else in that 'verse, though, IIRC. Hmm.)

I was spared having to decide, in this time of "yes, I swear, I'm trying to cut back on spending", whether I was going to get a "Literalists do it with their genitals!" shirt; the shirt is currently unavailable (as in, no longer showing up on the site at all, not just out of stock). My wallet is grateful.

*Ordered directly from the AGAHF store, and she was as appalled as I was at the shipping cost. It wasn't surprising, though.

The first week at Casual Job is over--all two days of it! (Four hours yesterday and eight today.) I'm having some tech frustration at the office that would take ages to type up and is not terribly interesting, but I'll say that I really, really hope the person who sometimes does on-site IT support for us is around on Monday, because WOW, calling the help desk was useless. -_-

So far at Hal-Con I've seen several people wearing geeky shirts from stories I know, and things like a Sailor Saturn costume down in the mall food court. (A moment of respectful silence for the food court workers this weekend, who'll be slammed.) But the best was when Ginny and I were running down from work to get lunch and ran into someone in Tohru cosplay! The cosplayer mentioned that she was off to get her Yuki and Kyo, but Ginny and I were then unsure if she'd meant plushies of the boys in their cursed forms or fellow cosplayers.
queenlua: (Default)
([personal profile] queenlua Sep. 21st, 2017 01:08 am)
I don't often read 50's era scifi nowadays—not because I hate it or anything. But, it tends toward hard science where I prefer softy goopy anthropological scifi, and it tends toward pulp and space opera when I'm more into artsy and earthy things. Moreover, its themes tend toward things that can feel strikingly archaic nowadays. Endless Cold War-era brooding of superpower stand-offs feel faintly quaint in a post-Soviet world where nuclear concerns are more diffuse, and tangled, and unpredictable and tenuous.

A Canticle for Leibowitz is absolutely 50's-era scifi, but very much unlike the rest. It's only called scifi because there's not another classification that really fits—"alternate history" maybe? There's no space opera here, just monks hanging out in abbeys, and even though it is basically the Cold War scenario—"what if nuclear holocaust"—its take is surprisingly fresh, even a half-century after its publication.

The book's divided into three sections, each six hundred years apart, starting six hundred years after The Big Nuclear Apocalypse. Christianity survives, but just barely, and a tiny order of monks out in the Utah desert have been busily preserving what few scraps of writing and civilization remain.

review )
umadoshi: (kittens - Claudia - thoughtful)
([personal profile] umadoshi Sep. 21st, 2017 01:04 am)
--I want to say it feels weird to think that I'm going back to the office tomorrow, but it doesn't seem real enough yet to feel weird. (Having had only something like a week of work in the spring is not really helping. I'd barely sat down at my desk and then we were finished!) What does feel weird is thinking--hoping!--that when I get home tomorrow there'll be a window where there is now a solid wall.


--The first few days back are usually pretty reasonable. (I could conceivably even be home for supper tomorrow evening!) Thankfully, today I was able to finish and submit the half-volume that's due tomorrow, so that's not hanging over me...but I'll need to go pick up my and [dreamwidth.org profile] scruloose's con passes, and then on Friday, no matter what time we wrap up at the office, I'll be going straight from there to the convention. I even made it as far as looking over the schedule and making notes this evening, although in practice I rarely make it to more than a small percentage of the panels and talks that catch my eyes. So many people. O_O (The "rarely" applies to cons and similar things in general, as this is only my second Hal-Con.)


--When I was poking around in my tags the other day to see if I could figure out when I stopped bouldering, I came across this 2013 post about Claudia from when she and Jinksy were about five months old. Oh, my kitten. *^^* (*finds baby!Claudia!kitten icon*)


--I have this half-formed theory that Casual Job is the appropriate excuse to actually start figuring out lipstick, since I really haven't, despite buying a bunch in Toronto. The defense I have to offer is that I'm usually at home living in pajamas when Casual Job isn't on (I'm very glad I'm not one of the many people who needs to Get Dressed to successfully work at home--although if it'd help my focus, you bet I'd do it), and when I go out it's usually either quick errands (hard to convince myself to bother) or to have dinner out with someone (and I know people eat and drink with lipstick on all the time, but it turns out I find it intimidating to consider needing to immediately touch it up while out if it smears/wears off).
twistedchick: General Leia in The Force Awakens (Default)
([personal profile] twistedchick Sep. 20th, 2017 08:08 pm)
Lillian Ross, the consummate New Yorker writer for decades, has died at 99 years old.

This is about her writing. And these are her writing: about the House Un-American Activity Committee -- and the search for "dangerous Communists" in Hollywood in the 1950s, and this is her walk-along interview with Ernest Hemingway, including his peculiar style of speaking without articles. And this is a NYTimes review of the book she wrote about her 50-year affair with her editor, who had died but whose wife was still alive. Well, you can't please everyone.

***

The neo-Nazis who look forward to concentration camps and Hitler on the money.

An examination of change in William Morris's The Wood Beyond the World.

Two kinds of wilderness, in Ireland.

This is weird and dangerous: government agencies suing people who file Freedom of Information Act requests for information they don't want made public.

Kremlin mouthpieces are attacking "emotional" Morgan Freeman for telling the truth in his video on Russia and Putin's KGB past. Methinks they doth protest too much.

All the Sinclair Broadcasting tv stations are being required to show Trumpist propaganda.

Ibram Kendi, a scholar of racism, says that education and love are not the answer to racism. Dismantling discriminatory politics is.

The Jesuits are returning 525 acres given to them in the 1880s to the Rosebud Sioux tribe.

West Africa's most daring designer.

Hillary looks back in anger.
Fannish/Geeky/SFF Things

"Seanan McGuire on What She Learned From October, Plus a Sweeps!" The interview is about what writing Toby's series (AKA her first novel and series) taught her, and the contest, which is open until September 30, is for all eleven books to date.

"Transcript for OTW 10th Anniversary Chat with Seanan McGuire & Martha Wells".

"Exclusive Interview and ARC Giveaway: In Other Lands author, Sarah Rees Brennan". This contest has closed, alas, but I really liked the interview (and its entirely appropriate attention to mermaids): "My protagonist Elliot is a huge nerd, so when he arrives in a magical world he immediately asks ‘Show me the mermaids!’ rather than ‘Explain to me this strange word… magic…’ and mermaids are for him a shorthand for him wanting to behold the many wonders on offer in a magic land–in other words, harpies, unicorns and mermaids, oh my. He then keeps asking about the mermaids, having lessons about them, researching them, getting different answers about mermaids from different people, until he finally does meet one–with consequences I will not spoil for those who do not yet know!"

"Sci-fi author Martha Wells on writing a series about a robot that calls itself Murderbot".

"‘SHEroes’: Wonder Woman meets Bionic Woman". "Lindsay Wagner, aka Jamie Sommers or “The Bionic Woman,” posted her photo with Lynda Carter, aka Diana Prince or “Wonder Woman,” on her Facebook page recently and, as expected, fans went wild with nostalgia."

"Superheroes for the Jewish New Year". [Book Riot]

Over at [dreamwidth.org profile] ladybusiness, [dreamwidth.org profile] renay posted a great interview with Kate Elliott.

"Present-Day Devices as Props". "Every Star Trek production requires a large number of props to act as technical devices of Starfleet or of aliens. There are custom prop designs for standard phasers, tricorders or communicators. But in most cases there is a need for additional props that either serve a specific purpose in the story or are used as generic futuristic decoration. Several of the props that could be seen are actually slightly modified devices of the 20th/21st century. In particular, game consoles have been used repeatedly for handheld scanners."

Sarah Gailey (author of the hippo-wrangling AUs River of Teeth and Taste of Marrow) currently has an unrelated serial, The Fisher of Bones, running in Fireside Magazine, who've just announced that the whole story is now available for preorder (and...get the ending before folks who're reading it/choose to keep reading it in serialization, which seems a bit odd to me, but sure).


TV/movie news

"Linda Hamilton Set to Return to 'Terminator' Franchise".

"MISS. FISHER’S MURDER MYSTERIES Movie Is a Go, Thanks to Kickstarter".

"“Madam Secretary” Showrunner Barbara Hall Developing CIA Drama for CBS" about "a multigenerational family of spies."

"The real hero of Netflix's "The Defenders" is the way Jessica Jones throws very heavy things".

"REPORT: Marvel Studios Developing a Power Pack Feature Film".


Miscellaneous

"Dictionary of the Oldest Written Language–It Took 90 Years to Complete, and It’s Now Free Online". [Open Culture]

"A 68 Hour Playlist of Shakespeare’s Plays Being Performed by Great Actors: Gielgud, McKellen & More". [Open Culture, 2015]

"Street Artist Paints Fantastic Fake Shadows Under Objects Perplexing Sidewalk Pedestrians Walking By".
mabiana: (Wolle)
([personal profile] mabiana Sep. 20th, 2017 12:45 pm)
I finished yet another shawl (I wear one daily in spring and autumn, so there is reason to my mass production ;-) ):

TuchOzean

I used the lace pattern from the Holden Shawlette pattern.
Tags:
lireavue: A section of the Preludia from the Bach Partita in E, text "rests are imaginary" between two staves. (rests are imaginary)
([personal profile] lireavue Sep. 19th, 2017 08:25 pm)
*It is fucking amazing how much the right setup makes for fiddle playing. I just. Wow. I knew it was bad before, but I've honestly spent my ENTIRE violin playing career dealing with stuff that wasn't Quite Right because I have a rather long neck compared to how long most shoulder-rest manufacturers seem to think the default is. And now I have one that's basically infinitely adjustable depending on how my muscles are yelling TODAY and it's so. much. better.

No of course I didn't break out the old Haydn concerto what do you take me for.

...that's tomorrow. Today I broke out the Bach Partita.

*Our new all-clad skillets are fucking amazing.

*...I am SURE there was something else specific to today that went here but I lost it, so instead: I just wandered through my list of crafts projects and lo and behold I DO in fact have 3-5 stitching projects that don't take a lot of setup, which will be RATHER crucial to my sanity as there's only so much of the lace mesh for bottle holders I can take. Or the garter for the straps.

*One of these days I might ever get back to participating in politics instead of skimming my feeds in horror, but it is not this day and the rest of the month isn't looking so fucking good either. I just can't, with a whole lot of shit right now, which is SO not helping any of the mental stuff but at the same time... I kinda really have to prioritize keeping me and mine from totally losing our shit? So.
twistedchick: (bittern OFQ)
([personal profile] twistedchick Sep. 19th, 2017 02:16 pm)
This so-called article is a piece of crap. It purports to provide the results of a study and conflates the numbers in the study with society as a whole in ignorant ways.

For example, second paragraph:

Just ask college students. A fifth of undergrads now say it’s acceptable to use physical force to silence a speaker who makes “offensive and hurtful statements.”


A fifth of undergrads? No. A fifth of the 1500 undergrad students they surveyed. That's 300 or so.


Villasenor conducted a nationwide survey of 1,500 undergraduate students at four-year colleges.


Nationwide? There are far more than 1,500 four-year colleges (for those of you not American, the word includes universities). How were the colleges chosen? How were the students chosen? How many were chosen at each university? How many overall were from the same discipline? There's no way to know. We don't even know if he chose accredited schools, or those pay-for-a-degree places. Did they ask at Ivy League schools, the majority of whose students come from well-off families? Did they ask at places like City College of New York, where the tuition is much lower and people who are there are from a variety of backgrounds, not wealthy? Ag and tech colleges, out in the countryside, or only urban colleges?

Further down it says the margin of error is 2-6 percent, "depending on the group." Oh, really? Which group is 2% and which is 6%? We aren't told. It appears we are to be grateful that a margin of error was even mentioned.

The whole thing is supposed to be about undergrads' understanding of First Amendment-protected free speech. Since we are not told the exact wording of the questions asked, it's impossible to know if the responses were appropriate to them, or if the questions were leading the students to a specific response.

And then there's this:

Let’s say a public university hosts a “very controversial speaker,” one “known for making offensive and hurtful statements.” Would it be acceptable for a student group to disrupt the speech “by loudly and repeatedly shouting so that the audience cannot hear the speaker”?

Astonishingly, half said that snuffing out upsetting speech — rather than, presumably, rebutting or even ignoring it — would be appropriate. Democrats were more likely than Republicans to find this response acceptable (62 percent to 39 percent), and men were more likely than women (57 percent to 47 percent). Even so, sizable shares of all groups agreed.

It gets even worse.

Respondents were also asked if it would be acceptable for a student group to use violence to prevent that same controversial speaker from talking. Here, 19 percent said yes....


Let's look more closely, ignoring the editorializing sentence for the moment. Half of who? Half of 1500 people is 750 people, scattered across the US. And then again -- 19% of who? Everyone? Women? Men? Democrats? Republicans? We aren't told.

Meanwhile, the entire other side of this survey is ignored. By stressing the minority and ignoring the majority, the minority's views are inflated and made more important. Let me turn this around for you: more than 80% of undergrads say that violence is not acceptable in dealing with an unwanted speaker. Try turning around all the other numbers, and the story falls apart. Instead of "students" substitute "students surveyed", and it also falls to pieces. Who cares what 1500 people out of 200 million think? If we don't know why those 1500 were specifically chosen, why should we care?

I have worked with surveys, written surveys, conducted and analyzed surveys. It is possible to have a statistically perfect survey with 1500 people surveyed, but only if the respondents are very carefully selected to avoid bias. There is no way to tell if that was done with the evidence given in this story. For all we know, those respondents could have been selected from the same departments or majors at all the colleges. The colleges could have been technical schools or enormous state universities or religion-affiliated schools. There is no way to know. Why does this matter? Liberal arts, political science and pre-law students are more likely to have read about the First Amendment than optics majors or engineers, for instance. I'm not saying the optics majors or engineers would be more conservative or liberal -- but they are less likely to have discussed free speech in a class. Improper choice of respondents can provide very slanted results -- for example, the survey that said Dewey would win over Truman was conducted by telephone, and the calls went to houses on the corners of two streets; this meant that people who were wealthier (because corner houses pay higher taxes, based on road frontage) were questioned, while their less wealthy neighbors (who voted for Truman) were ignored.

Also, by not including any context relative to current events, there is no way to know if the small percentage who thought violence was acceptable was the same as during the Vietnam War, for instance, or Desert Storm. I guarantee you, it was not the same percentage as during the Revolutionary War, when those who spoke against any prevailing view to an audience who disagreed would have been lucky to have been ridden out of town on a rail, if not tarred and feathered. (Feel free to do the research if you wish; be sure you have a strong stomach for the details of what happens when boiling tar is applied to skin.)

What it all comes down to is this: this story is written poorly by someone who does not understand how statistics should be used, and was not properly edited. It was published in order to scare people, although the publisher may not have realized its propaganda value. By not including the whole story, and by allowing editorializing in the middle of it, it slants the results.

This would not have been published during the time when Kay Graham was publisher. Editor Ben Bradlee would not have let this story pass. He would have told the reporter to rewrite it, clean it up, and get more depth into it.

And the reason I am writing this is that this is not the only paper that misleads with statistics, and you need to be aware of this, and of what to look for when someone is quoting a study, badly, misleadingly, in a way that bids fair to be used for propaganda. Be cautious and critical when you see numbers and statistics, and look for whether the writing is made personal/editorialized. It matters.
I'll work backwards (chronologically) in this post.

I just finished registering and paying for the Friday evening class (for which [dreamwidth.org profile] wildpear and [dreamwidth.org profile] seolh were already registered), so I guess it's now a definite Thing That Will Be Happening. Time to spend the next week and a half trying to get back in the habit of stretching regularly. >.>

There was some uncertainty before I successfully got registered. The online registration process was straightforward for the trial class, but two things happened almost simultaneously re: the actual class. 1) I got a follow-up email from the studio saying they hoped I'd enjoyed the trial class and listing the beginner timeslots that still had openings...a list which did not include the one I wanted (AKA the one my friends were already registered for, not to mention being the only one that could conceivably work with Casual Job going on), and 2) the online class schedule/registration form showed "(3 Reserved, 5 Open)", but didn't have a "sign up now" button (which some others did). TBH, I still have NO clue what's going on there, but after exchanging some emails with the studio, we established that the class did have openings, and now I've given them money, so I should be good to go.

As for the actual trial class on Friday, it could get long, and involves fitness talk, so I'll put it under a cut )
lireavue: A male lion, left forepaw covering his face in classic facepalm. (facepaw)
([personal profile] lireavue Sep. 18th, 2017 10:54 pm)
I would like to be done with having this broken-ass excuse for a brain ANYTIME okay.

Things, in no particular order.

*I am apparently losing about a month to PTSD and the resultant depressive spiral/anhedonia/miasma of Awful. Thus far, a month. Who the fuck knows how much longer: I FEEL like I might be climbing out, somewhat, but I honestly don't know, and every time I think I'm starting to get a grip something else comes along to knock me over again? So I'm just acting like it's NOT going to end and applying the appropriate coping mechanisms. It's immensely frustrating.

*Despite this I'm slowly, slowly picking up weaving terminology and I know where to go for lessons, so that's something, I suppose.

*At some point I'm probably going to have a BUNCH more awkward conversations that amount to "no he's also an asshole" and I am very tired of these conversations. I would like to skip to the part where we admit there is abuse and now we figure out how to handle it.

*Jag talked me into watching all of The Defenders in two days and now I want all the femmeslash fic ever. SO MANY POSSIBILITIES, YOU GUYS.

*I would probably feel a fuck of a lot better in the overall if I could convince myself that exercise was a thing, even in the most minimal way possible, but I am TOTALLY out of spoons for convincing myself of new shit after dragging myself through routines on a daily basis, AND it's supposed to be disgustingly hot the rest of the week. Especially for September, but generally as well: turn on the AC kind of hot. Maybe I'll try and get my brain convinced that wandering out to the playground picnic table and sitting at a pokestop with some knitting is a good idea in the morning, some day this week. I don't even fucking know.

*There probably should be a few more things here but every time I try to write an entry it all falls out of my head because, see aforementioned broken-ass brain, and also it's nearly 1130 and I've taken my melatonin, so I should probably try and sleep.
kayre: (Default)
([personal profile] kayre Sep. 18th, 2017 03:19 pm)
I'm lactose intolerant. It's pretty much a joke in our culture now, but I really am, and quite severely, plus I get a couple of extra reactions as a bonus. Even a small dose of milk means 6 to 12 hours of diarrhea and stinky farts, another day or two of feeling achy and uncomfortable, patches of eczema that last a few days. LactAid pills help; they most definitely don't prevent reaction.

Churches love food. Coffee hour with sweet baked treats. Refreshments at almost every gathering, ranging from more sweet goodies to pizza. Potluck suppers. Catered suppers-- spaghetti, lasagna, even turkey dinners.

If I don't tell folks (and maybe if I do, see below), my choices are: eat and get sick; don't eat anything; bring my own food; or skip the event. Oddly, anything but the first will upset some folk. Abstaining or bringing my own food leads to people being hurt that I won't try their offerings, or even accusing me of 'trying to make them feel guilty.' And as a church staffer, skipping food events can be a professional problem as well as a social sadness.

From the church point of view? It's a bother to accommodate food issues. There are at least four of us who are lactose intolerant to some degree; two vegetarians; two people with celiac disease who are only occasional attenders; one minor nut allergy (but not to the point of violent reaction); and, unknown to most, at least one recovering alcoholic. Folks who can and do eat anything and everything seem to find it overwhelming to contemplate feeding those of us with food issues. Mostly the reactions I see are thinly veiled irritation.

What could be done? First and easiest would just be to LABEL everything. Put out a card with the name of the dish on one side, and ingredients on the other (or I don't know/made from mix). Next-- actually talk to us and ask what works? I am absolutely happy to suggest possibilities, substitutions, or modifications that aren't burdensome; after all, I do them daily. Considering varying needs early in the planning is especially helpful-- salad bar rather than tossed and dressed salad, please!

But the bottom line... is that I am often reminded that I'm not worth the trouble of feeding me. (Not only at church, but honestly, it's the worst.) Me being lactose intolerant is inconvenient for other people. Sorry, not terribly sympathetic to that point of view.
[dreamwidth.org profile] sovay went to a vampire movie marathon earlier this month and wrote about the movies. (If you read and enjoy the post, remember that [dreamwidth.org profile] sovay has a Patreon for film reviews!)

"Tag Yourself, I Am the Irish Bat Dad". "The video was filmed by Tadhg Fleming, and went viral when reposted by @jonnohopkins, and if you haven't seen it then I would describe it as 'the Citizen Kane of portrait-mode Snapchat stories about a bat getting in'. But I would like you to now avert your gaze away from the video and instead turn it deep inwards. Who are you? What are you? What is the very spirit of you? Your essence? You know it. But sometimes it's hard to express. Who, exactly, are you: are you a mood, a note on a piano, a taste, a feeling? Are you light, colour, heat, sound? Whatever you are, I think you can find yourself in this video. I think you can tag yourself in amongst the chaos. Here are some suggested tags – feel free to add your own:"

"This is How Canada Talks".

"BPD and the Pace of Friendship". [author Mishell Baker]

"10+ Adorable Comics That Hilariously Sum Up What It’s Like Living With A Dog".

"Meet the man fighting to save our country's rarest chickens".

Genevieve Valentine posted her red-carpet rundown for the Emmys.

"Octlantis is a just-discovered underwater city engineered by octopuses".

Via [dreamwidth.org profile] calissa, "A Digression About Storytelling, Narratives, and Diversity by Bárbara Morais". [The Book Smugglers]



Several links via [dreamwidth.org profile] alisanne:

--"100 Common Myths & Misconceptions: The world's most widespread falsehoods - debunked!"

--"What Happens When People Are Bored At Work (10+ Pics)".

--"Celebrities Re-Created 1940s Hollywood Glamour Shots And They're Gorgeous". [Buzzfeed]

--"10+ Dogs Who Don’t Understand How BIG They Are And Think They’re Lap Dogs".

--"Spite Houses: 12 Homes Created With Anger and Angst". [2015]

--"Amateur Vs. Pro: How Differently The Same ‘Ugly’ Location Looks When You Become A Professional Photographer".

--"10 Badass Trees That Refuse To Die".

--"28 Precious Vintage Photos of Children With Their Pets".

--"This Russian Photographer Captures Stunning Photos Of Kids And Their Pets".
There is a type of mental disorder I know about that really should be addressed. It's a very common one, but there's an amount of people who would rather not recognize it, no matter how bad it is.

The solution cure this disorder should be simple, but it's not. It not only requires time to understand how the human brain works. Curing oneself of it not only requires the understanding how and why various groups of individuals behave the way they do. It also requires self-examination, persistence, and courage to get more people to become aware of why they are insecure and uncertain about themselves. And more, because this disorder is so deep rooted within so many.

It's insanely bad, because it's caused a lot of human suffering for several years, partially due of the lack of knowledge about it. It's caused a lot of people to be at conflict with each other, as well as within themselves without really being aware of it.

What I'm explaining is not just any mental disorder, by the way. It's man-made, and institutionalized through very sinister ways. It's a psychological conditioning embedded so deep within the larger majority of the human race.

Dang. Once I get writing I can never keep it very short. )
I have good intentions about reporting back on the trial aerial silks class, but for now: I survived, I am nowhere near as bendy as I used to (SHOCKING, I know), and I'm almost definitely going to sign up for the actual class but haven't done so yet. (I did check and make sure it's not right on the verge of being full. Right now the registration site says five out of eight slots are still free, and one of the three claimed slots is [dreamwidth.org profile] seolh.)

I already mentioned the key bit of this on Twitter ([twitter.com profile] MermaidLure, not [twitter.com profile] ysabet_m), but I went from that studio's website to the one of the place where I took nearly all of my dance classes, long and long ago. exercise classes and my dance history (such as it is) and whatnot )

Garden stuff!

Our tomato harvest is a bit awkwardly sized: we're bringing in enough fruit that [dreamwidth.org profile] scruloose is having a bit of trouble keeping up with eating them, but not enough that we think (at useful times) of foisting some off on people because we're ~drowning in tomatoes~ or anything. There also aren't enough at one time to make it obvious that we can/should just cook up a big batch of sauce or something. It's a little weird.

Anyway, it being fall means that our thoughts have turned to planting bulbs! A couple of days ago we placed an order with Vesey's, in which [dreamwidth.org profile] scruloose and I ordered 30 Prince Claus snow crocuses, 40 Tricolor snow crocuses, 30 of the Snow Crocus Mix bulbs, 20 of the Jessie starflowers, and 20 of the Mixed Daffodils mix.

...I didn't fully process until just now, typing that all up, that this means we bought 100 crocus bulbs. I mean, I knew, but...it just didn't seem like that many, somehow. La!

I was seriously tempted by some irises, but we opted against them. The German and Bearded varieties are beautiful but expensive, and we didn't really have an idea of where to put them, and this lovely Dutch Iris Mix starts at a package of 75 bulbs. O_o

We also ordered another set of three tomato halos, but not another set of the stackable tomato ladders, as we discovered this year that Canadian Tire offers very similarly-shaped tomato cages that can be stacked on top of the Vesey's ones. This'll bring us up to six each of the halos and the Vessey's ladder segments, which are meant to slot together, and then we can use the Canadian Tire ones for height. (You can see our current arrangement fairly well in the third picture here, where the red components are from Vessey's and the green ones--which aren't meant to be stackable, but do come in a longer version if we ever want still more height--are from Canadian Tire. This year, with our ten tomato plants, some of the green ones got pressed into service in as single-segment supports, but at the far left you can see a plant with a base Vesey's ladder plus a Canadian Tire one for height.)
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